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gentlewave:

Zhang Li: Gannan Tibetan Woman, (2011), 80 x 65 cm, source: chinarealism.com.

gentlewave:

Zhang Li: Gannan Tibetan Woman, (2011), 80 x 65 cm, source: chinarealism.com.

man-of-prose:

"I meet you. I remember you. Who are you? You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. How could I know this city was tailor-made for love? How could I know you fit my body like a glove? I like you. How unlikely. I like you. How slow all of a sudden. How sweet. You cannot know. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. I have time. Please, devour me. Deform me to the point of ugliness. Why not you? Why not you in this city and in this night, so like other cities and other nights you can hardly tell the difference? I beg of you."
-Marguerite Duras, Hiroshima mon amour

man-of-prose:

"I meet you. I remember you. Who are you? You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. How could I know this city was tailor-made for love? How could I know you fit my body like a glove? I like you. How unlikely. I like you. How slow all of a sudden. How sweet. You cannot know. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. I have time. Please, devour me. Deform me to the point of ugliness. Why not you? Why not you in this city and in this night, so like other cities and other nights you can hardly tell the difference? I beg of you."

-Marguerite Duras, Hiroshima mon amour

free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.

Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.

travelingcolors:

Standardized Metro Maps Around the World (by Jug Cerovic)

French-Serbian architect Jug Cerovic has standardized international subway maps with INAT, a guideline developed to unify the global metro network with easy to read and memorize charts. Each city’s center is enlarged, to make room for the multiplicity of lines and connecting stations. A standard set of symbols is applied to each map including the line colors, stations, connections and station labeling. Angles are gently curved for a smooth familiar look and linear paths are represented vertically, horizontally, or 45, with no more than 5 bends on their entire length. Highly representative shapes are used for specific ubran features: a ring for Moscow and Paris, a parallelogram for London, and regularly spaced parallel lines for gridded street patterns like new York. All text is labelled in both local and latin characters and are legible on small sized prints for pocket use and suitable for display on a wide array of supports.

cjwho:

Narigua House, Mexico by David Pedroza Castañeda | via

Completed by David Pedroza Castañeda architects in 2013, the Nirigua House is a colossal residence in Mexico covering 8,000 square-feet. Built up in the mountainous woodlands, the home offers spectacular 360º views of the beautiful landscape while simultaneously respecting the existing ecosystem.

To preserve the existing greenery, a floor plan was devised with various different “zones” that group around the old cedar trees. The first zone contains the garage and storage spaces. The entrance hall, master bedroom, and staircase to the lower level are all located in the second volume, and the third features the kitchen and social area. The building material selection also help the building to blend into its surroundings, with copper and stained wood making for a rustic aesthetic.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

bymayaiman:

Maya Iman Creative Direction/Styling
Danielle Pilota MUA
Troy Gueno Photography Assistant 

bymayaiman:

Maya Iman Creative Direction/Styling

Danielle Pilota MUA

Troy Gueno Photography Assistant 

kinspirational:

flower covered areas

sources

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9

(via fairykeikeikei)

showslow:

Artistic Makeup by Katie Alves

gentlewave:

Zhang Li: Gannan Tibetan Woman, (2011), 80 x 65 cm, source: chinarealism.com.

gentlewave:

Zhang Li: Gannan Tibetan Woman, (2011), 80 x 65 cm, source: chinarealism.com.

man-of-prose:

"I meet you. I remember you. Who are you? You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. How could I know this city was tailor-made for love? How could I know you fit my body like a glove? I like you. How unlikely. I like you. How slow all of a sudden. How sweet. You cannot know. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. I have time. Please, devour me. Deform me to the point of ugliness. Why not you? Why not you in this city and in this night, so like other cities and other nights you can hardly tell the difference? I beg of you."
-Marguerite Duras, Hiroshima mon amour

man-of-prose:

"I meet you. I remember you. Who are you? You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. How could I know this city was tailor-made for love? How could I know you fit my body like a glove? I like you. How unlikely. I like you. How slow all of a sudden. How sweet. You cannot know. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. You’re destroying me. You’re good for me. I have time. Please, devour me. Deform me to the point of ugliness. Why not you? Why not you in this city and in this night, so like other cities and other nights you can hardly tell the difference? I beg of you."

-Marguerite Duras, Hiroshima mon amour

free-parking:

Paintings by Hilma af Klint (1862-1944)

Five years before Wassily Kandinsky (he of the book Concerning the Spiritual In Art, 1910), before Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, before the images of Carl Jung and Rudolf Steiner—who dismissed her ideas as wrong—was this revolutionary artist and abstractionist, Hilma af Klint, possibly the first purely abstract painter to produced non-objective works in the early 1900s.

Hilma af Klint was influenced by contemporary spiritual movements, such as spiritism, theosophy and, later, anthroposophy. Her oeuvre builds on the awareness of a spiritual dimension of consciousness, an aspect that was being marginalised in an increasingly materialistic world. When she painted, she believed that a higher consciousness was speaking through her. In her astonishing works she combines geometric shapes and symbols with ornamentation. Her multifaceted imagery strives to give insights into the different dimensions of existence, where microcosm and macrocosm reflect one another.

(Source: viverevolo)

travelingcolors:

Standardized Metro Maps Around the World (by Jug Cerovic)

French-Serbian architect Jug Cerovic has standardized international subway maps with INAT, a guideline developed to unify the global metro network with easy to read and memorize charts. Each city’s center is enlarged, to make room for the multiplicity of lines and connecting stations. A standard set of symbols is applied to each map including the line colors, stations, connections and station labeling. Angles are gently curved for a smooth familiar look and linear paths are represented vertically, horizontally, or 45, with no more than 5 bends on their entire length. Highly representative shapes are used for specific ubran features: a ring for Moscow and Paris, a parallelogram for London, and regularly spaced parallel lines for gridded street patterns like new York. All text is labelled in both local and latin characters and are legible on small sized prints for pocket use and suitable for display on a wide array of supports.

cjwho:

Narigua House, Mexico by David Pedroza Castañeda | via

Completed by David Pedroza Castañeda architects in 2013, the Nirigua House is a colossal residence in Mexico covering 8,000 square-feet. Built up in the mountainous woodlands, the home offers spectacular 360º views of the beautiful landscape while simultaneously respecting the existing ecosystem.

To preserve the existing greenery, a floor plan was devised with various different “zones” that group around the old cedar trees. The first zone contains the garage and storage spaces. The entrance hall, master bedroom, and staircase to the lower level are all located in the second volume, and the third features the kitchen and social area. The building material selection also help the building to blend into its surroundings, with copper and stained wood making for a rustic aesthetic.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

bymayaiman:

Maya Iman Creative Direction/Styling
Danielle Pilota MUA
Troy Gueno Photography Assistant 

bymayaiman:

Maya Iman Creative Direction/Styling

Danielle Pilota MUA

Troy Gueno Photography Assistant 

kinspirational:

flower covered areas

sources

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9

(via fairykeikeikei)

showslow:

Artistic Makeup by Katie Alves

About:

this blog is about 'resonance' - works I respond to one way or the other.

sometimes my posts are cherry-picked memorabilia, reverberating with deeper layers of my personal experiences, other times they just evoke fleeting sensations.

as a kid I used to pencil or cut-n-paste inspirational quotes and photos of "mana-filled" objects in notebooks.

a blog just makes it easier, neater and funnier to make a notebook with some of the stuff I stumble upon and share it with anyone who happens to "browse by"...

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